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Acoustics Today

This quarterly magazine contains tutorials, technical articles, ASA news, and more. The pieces in the magazine are aimed at people with a general background in acoustics, but might not be versed in the particular featured subject. Read past issues here.

 

Lay Language Papers

Lay language papers are short versions of papers and talks presented at Annual Meetings of the Acoustical Society of America. Please keep in mind that some of the research described in the lay papers may not have yet been peer reviewed. See all papers here.

 

A Sonar Experiment to Study Sound Propagation through Flames

Our initial goal is to locate an open doorway or hallway through flames and smoke within a burning building, but even this simple goal could greatly enhance a firefighters ability to navigate through a burning building and out of danger. From a more fundamental physical acoustics perspective, we are interested in understanding how fire, heat and smoke between the device and a target effect acoustic propagation.

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Jurassic Acoustics: Global Warming May Take the Low Frequency Sound Transmission Properties of the Ocean Back to the Age of the Dinosaurs

By analyzing the boron in ocean sediments scientists have been able to determine how acidic the ocean has been all the way back to 300 million years ago. We can then use this data to determine the low frequency sound transmission. It turns out that 300 million years ago the sound transmission in the ocean was quite similar to what we have today.

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Inventing a New Musical Instrument Before You Are 20 Years Old

Students had to ensure the instruments played notes of the Western musical scale and that the timbres of the instruments allowed them to be played together in an ensemble. Finally, the students were required to compose original music for ensembles of these instruments and play them in a public concert in the college’s concert hall.

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Active Hearing Protection for Musicians

Studies show that musicians seldom use hearing protection despite being exposed to harmful sound levels on a daily basis. Noise-induced hearing loss does not distinguish between genres of music; as a consequence of overexposure to sound, famous artists such as Eric Clapton, Ozzy Osbourne, Pete Townshend, and Neil Young have reported suffering from hearing loss, tinnitus or both.

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Estimating Fetal Heart Rate From Multiple Doppler Ultrasound Signals

One important issue (and first step in our investigation) is the accurate estimation of fetal heart rate (FHR). An estimation of the FHR is obtained by evaluating the autocorrelation function of the Doppler signals for ill and healthy foetuses.

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